Posts tagged farm

Light and Flaky Greek Phyllo Spinach and Cheese Breakfast Dish

Greek Phyllo Spinach and Cheese Bake

Greek Phyllo Spinach and Cheese Bake

This version of the Greek cheese and spinach pastry called spanakopita adds three cheeses and fresh dill to the traditional recipe.  Store-bought phyllo pastry makes this recipe easy and the do-ahead preparation makes this dish ideal for bed & breakfasts or entertaining.

ingredients:

10-20 Phyllo pastry sheets, defrosted (quantity according to desired flakiness of the crust)

4 Tablespoons melted butter

1 Tablespoon olive oil

1 Onion finely chopped

1 10-ounce package frozen chopped spinach, thawed, with the moisture squeezed out

1 Cup ricotta cheese

4 ounces feta cheese crumbled

4 ounces grated jack cheese

2 eggs

2 Tablespoons chopped fresh dill

1/8 Teaspoon coarse salt

1/8 Teaspoon fresh ground black pepper

 

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.  Butter a 13 x 9 x 2 inch baking dish.

Heat olive oil in a frying pan and saute onions until softened.  Place in a large mixing bowl.

Three Cheese Mixture; Feta, Ricotta and Jack

Three Cheese Mixture; Feta, Ricotta and Jack

Add spinach, ricotta, crumbled feta, jack cheese, eggs, dill, salt and pepper and stir well.

Fresh Dill

Fresh Dill

Spread mixture over the bottom of the baking dish.  Top with Phyllo pastry, layered one by one, brushing lightly with melted butter on every other phyllo sheet.

Bake approximately 30 minutes until phyllo pastry is golden brown.  Use a sharp knife to cut through the pastry, in to squares and serve hot.

Light and Flaky Greek Phyllo Spinach and Cheese Breakfast Dish

Light and Flaky Greek Phyllo Spinach and Cheese Breakfast Dish

This dish may be prepared the night before if it is covered tightly.

Greek Phyllo Spinach and Cheese Bake

Greek Phyllo Spinach and Cheese Bake

 

 

 

 

Advertisements

Leave a comment »

Miniature Gardening

Gnome with wire vine

Gnome with wire vine

We can’t wait for spring to arrive so we can get out in to the garden!  Miniature gardening indoors is a perfect way to satisfy that gardening urge while there’s still snow on the ground.  These miniature plants are absolutely luscious!

Fairy with an African Violet

Fairy with an African Violet

 

Gnome with Club Moss

Gnome with Club Moss

 

Fairy with Hypoestes "Pink Splash"

Fairy with Hypoestes "Pink Splash"

To read more, enjoy the blog linked below.

http://ottenbros.wordpress.com/2012/02/01/terrarium-and-miniature-garden-plants/

Comments (2) »

Miniature and Fairy Gardens

 

Miniature fairy garden

Miniature fairy garden

 

We love miniature gardens and fairy gardens and we’ve shared this posting with great photos about how to build the gardens.

http://ottenbros.wordpress.com/2012/01/24/building-a-fairy-garden-part-2/

Cheers!

Leave a comment »

Recycle Your Christmas Tree in to a Bird Feeder

“A bird doesn’t sing because it has an answer, it sings because it has a song.” ~ Maya Angelou

As the needles begin to fall from your Christmas tree, it’s time to consider recycling, or ‘up-cycling’ the tree.  Consider turning your tree into a natural birdie banquet for the new year!

Remove your precious keepsake ornaments and replace them with bird friendly tasty ‘ornaments’.  After you have un-decorated the tree, move it outdoors, and secure it to a sturdy location outdoors such as next to a flag pole or post using a bungee cord or twine.  Locate the tree as you would locate any bird feeder.  Birds prefer a spot about 10 feet from cover, either evergreens or shrubs.  This distance prevents predators such as cats from stalking the birds as they eat.  It also gives the birds a place to rest.

Recycled Christmas Tree Turned Bird Feeder

Recycled Christmas Tree Turned Bird Feeder

If you have trouble with birds colliding with your windows, locate your tree (and other feeders) closer to the windows, as this tree is, so the birds are travelling at a slower speed when they collide which will reduce the number of casualties.

Decorate the tree with any bird feeder you choose.  We’ve made our own feeders using pine cones, spread with peanut butter, then rolled in birdseed.

Pine Cone with Peanut Butter and Rolled in Bird Seed

Pine Cone with Peanut Butter and Rolled in Bird Seed

Tie a ribbon around the cone to create a hanger for hanging on the tree.

Thistle Feeder

Thistle Feeder

We’ve also hung an inexpensive nylon thistle feeder (available at your local garden center) filled with thistle, a favorite for finches.

Suet Feeder

Suet Feeder

We have also  added a suet feeder for our wintering woodpeckers to enjoy.  Bon appetite!

Leave a comment »

Winter birding in Minnesota

Birding is fun all year long, but during the winter, birds require slightly different nutritional requirements and menu than during the summertime.

Water is the most important ingredient of a winter feeding program.  Often well intentioned birders feed birds during the winter but forget that our avian friends require water.

Cardinal at heated bird bath

Cardinal at heated bird bath

You’ll need a heating element to keep the bird bath water from freezing, and these heaters can be found at your local garden center.

You may want to place your bird bath and winter feeders on a deck railing so they are easier to access when the snow accumulates.

Place feeders in your yard preferably near a shelter provided by conifers, marsh or buildings.  However, to avoid giving raptors and cats an advantage in catching birds, feeders should be at least ten feet from the nearest cover where predators could hide.

Black oil sunflower seed and cardinal mixes have the greatest appeal to the largest spectrum of birds wintering in Minnesota.  That list of birds includes cardinals, blue jays, black-capped chickadees, finches and nuthatches.

Peanuts are nutritious for birds such as woodpeckers, blue jays, and cardinals.

Woodpecker at peanut feeder

Woodpecker at peanut feeder

Many wintering birds such as woodpeckers, chickadees and nuthatches benefit from the high energy nutritional benefits of suet and peanut butter.

Using these tips your birds will stay all winter and find nutrition and water when they need it most.

Leave a comment »